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Amazing Knitting Machine Hack Glitch Knit by Japanese

I found an amazing Knitting Machine Hack and production system by some Japanese artists and developers online called Glitch Knit. The team brings together Nukeme, a hardware engineer Tomofumi YOSHIDA, the software engineer So KANNO and a supporting member Emi YAMAMOTO.

The team uses a brother KH970 knitting machine, which was produced until 2005 and was discontinued afterwards. The parts list for hacking the machine:
* Arduino Due
* Connector : MicroBlade™ 53014-0810
* Photo interrupter : Sharp GP1S58VJ000F or compatibles
* Transistor Array : TD6208APG or compatibles

PCB
The team made circuit boards with a paperboard for prototyping with Adobe Illustrator and a Laser Cutter.

Source Code
The source code is available at Github here: github.com/sokanno/KnitHack

GlitchKnit Knitting Machines Hack
GlitchKnit Set up

Software GlitchKnit Knitting Machines Hack
GlitchKnit Software

GlitchKnit Knitting Products
Glitch Knit Outcome

From the website description: This project divided into two main content. Firstly, by hacking a knitting machine, exposing the environment that can be output an image as knit by anyone. Secondly, by using the knitting machine that we hack, to make a “Glitch Knit”. The glitch is "damaged of data or machinery" and "damaged data but possible to play". The “Glitch Knit” has two different way. One is output of the digital image data which was glitched. The other is to damage the structure of lace knit. It is output as knit full of holes. Knitting machine that is hacked, is introduced as a new equipment in FabLabShibuya, and how to hack is also published on Github and Instructables. In this project, knit work is also the work, and the environment itself for making the knit is also work. This is a kind of digital fabrication, extension of the handicraft, and device hacking. And more this is the one of methodology for fashion design and a thing descended the glitch movement. (http://www.glitchknit.jp/#about)

このプロジェクトは、内容としては大きく2つに分かれています。1つ目は、ニッティングマシーンをハックし、誰でも画像をニットとして出力できる環境を公開すること、2つ目は、ハックしたニッティングマシーンを使ってグリッチニットを作ることです。 グリッチとは、”機械やデータの破損そのもの”や、”破損しているけれど再生が可能な状態”のことを指します。 グリッチニットの制作方法は2つあります。1つはグリッチした画像データを、ニットとして出力したもの。もう1つはレース編みの構造を破綻させ、穴だらけのニットとして出力したものです。 ハックしたニッティングマシーンは、FabLabShibuyaに新たな機材として導入され、そのハックの方法も含めて公開されています。 このプロジェクトでは、ニット作品も作品であり、ニット作品を作るための環境自体もまた、作品です。 これはデジタル・ファブリケーションの一種であり、手芸の延長であり、デバイス・ハッキングでもあり、かつ、グリッチ・ムーブメントの流れを汲んだもので、そしてファッション・デザインのための一つの方法論です。

Team:
Designer: Nukeme nukeme.nu
Hardware engineer: Tomofumi YOSHIDA techno-shugei.com
Software engineer: So KANNO kanno.so / kanno.so/glitch-knit/
Support: Emi YAMAMOTO www.fablabshibuya.org
Links
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Athens Dinner at Battle of the Mesh

A few weeks ago I had the chance to participate in Battle of the Mesh, the competition event for the best performing routing protocols, in Athens. After not having seen my friends from Ninux.org in Italy for a long time, we finally got together in the evening and enjoyed Greek food, salad with Feta cheese and of course great conversations. We made a lot of new plans for wifi apps and map servers. Thank you Saverio for the idea of making this video!

Ninux dinner at Battlemesh V5 from Saverio Proto on Vimeo.

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Videodokumentation: Bei Freunden in der Ukraine - Ankunft in Iwano-Frankiwsk (Teil 1)


Videolink: http://video.google.com/videoplay?docid=-1216650022947849904

Für fünf Tage ist die Gruppe um Michael aus Tutow (Vorpommern) in Iwano-Frankiwsk in der Ukraine. Sie wohnen in der Zweiraumwohnung von Lonja und Tanja. Michael kennt sie noch von früher, als sie in der DDR mit der „Roten Armee“ bei der sowjetischen Luftwaffe stationiert waren. Seit der Wende macht er sich fast jährlich auf den Weg besucht Freunde und verteilt Sachspenden, die er in Deutschland gesammelt hat.

Nach mehr als 36 Stunden Fahrt und 9 Stunden Warten an der Grenze kommen sie endlich um sechs Uhr morgens in „Iwano“ an. Lonja und Tanja begrüßen sie zusammen mit ihrer Tochter mit Brot, sauren Gurken und ukrainischen Wodka. Die Sachen, die die Gruppe mitgebracht hat, werden ausgepackt. Gleich probiert Lonja die Kleidung von der Bundeswehr, die Michael für ihn besorgt hat.
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I love fake

I love fake. During my last trip to Vietnam and China I just realised how much I love fakes and copies. I find them funny and innovative. Shoes, shirts, pants, belts, caps, even computers and telephones.. People are so creative. Actually what I love most is not the real looking fake. I love the real fake be it “Erke”, “Adiboss” or “Nuvea”. I took these pics in Doha, Qatar on December 13.

Unfortunately they did not have my size!

adiboss in Doha, Qatar, December 2007
White Adiboss shoes with stripes in different colors

adiboss in Doha, Qatar, December 2007
Brownish Adiboss shoes

erke in Doha, Qatar, December 2007
Blue Erke in Doha

All layers must be free in a a free civilization

Countless working examples of people creating free layers show the huge potential of free and open systems. However interior and exterior difficulties and problems in communities that are engaged in projects like in the free software world cannot always be overcome.

Successful as well as failed ideas and projects can teach invaluable lessons. To learn about the way people work together, their common ideas, differences and their culture as well as about the opposition to these ideas does not only teach us a lot about the successful organization of free layered projects, it could indeed teach us some basic lessons how a free society could work.

I believe a civilization where all layers are free, a civilization with a culture of free exchange and collaboration can guarantee a truly free society.

To know what difficulties lie ahead in the creation of a free civilization, or rather free societies, and what strategies and solutions are available, we should look for answers in the communities engaged in free layered projects that are already successful today as well as to projects that encountered problems, splitted up or even stopped working completely.

Free Society = Read-Write Society: A Culture of Openness and Free Collaboration

What made and makes the development of free software, free content and free infrastructures – alternatives to centralized systems of knowledge distribution and development possible? What made and makes the system of the many in contrast to the system of the few and powerful possible?

The Internet is an important factor, but indeed it is much more the culture of openness and free collaboration that constitutes the basis for free layers. It is a cultural change that took off in the aftermath of the peaceful revolutions in the world and the fall of the Berlin wall 1989. A short time when people took politics in their own hands and when “the end of history” was proclaimed by Francis Fukuyama. Many criticized him and regarded this statement as invalid proven by the aftermaths. Looking at what happened at a level far apart from daily superficial politics – how people started to create free layers – I find it rather valid, if it is slightly rephrased to “the end of old history”.

In the times before 1989 few people were able to take part in the production of content and culture. Afterwards more and more people simply safeguarded their rights and started collaborating on the most different topics. This is not only a change of how people behave but indeed this changes the way reality is perceived. The production of content and free publication is a lively way to write our own history.

The people’s history is completely opposite to the way history “was made”, or often we could even use the word “fabricated”, before. It includes all its facets and different opinions of people involved and enables a look closer to the actual happenings of a time than any historian could possibly allow us to see. The many different views and descriptions are presented directly and indirectly. The observations, ideas and intentions of producers can be directly observed in the actual content they produce, like in the articles of Wikipedia, or in the way software programs function, like Linux. Indirect conclusions about the world we live in can be drawn through the transparency and openness of the productions processes in free layers, e.g. the version history in Wikipedia or the documentation, the open sources and versions in the free software production.

The openness of free layers allows everyone to be a historian. “In the old days” to be a historian was a profession limited to a few. Until today historians were the historians of the powerful, the ones that provided them with the opportunities to work or simpler said with food and shelter. They wrote down what the future world would know of a time. Isn’t it therefore mostly the history of the winners that we quote today?

It changes in the aftermath of the freedom movements in 1989 and the growth of the free Internet (“as in freedom”, Stallman). This is “the begin of a new history”, where people write their own history in blogs, forums, mailing lists and wikis – the (his)stories of the many not the few.

In the Read-Write Society (Lawrence Lessig) people create their own content, own software, own infrastructures, own hardware. And thus they create their own realities, their own truths, their own society. More and more label their productions as free – free software, free wireless networks, free music, free videos, free texts and whole free encyclopedias. Free licenses allow people to copy and redistribute their work and the works of others freely to and by anyone and sometimes even to change and to sell it – the start of completely free layers.

Nevertheless looking at the real number of people actually participating in creating these free layers – publishing content or producing free software, it is still a small number of people. However many more already profit from this information and knowledge gathering. Wikipedia is one of the top sites on the Internet. Imagine what else can be achieved through this culture of freedom.

A world where everything is free

Imagine a world, where everything is free. Impossible? Right now people all over the world are working on this idea. They want to create a world where you can instantly have access to free content like free music, videos or texts, free software like free operating systems, programs, computer games and even powerful search engines, free hardware like plans for computer chips and free infrastructure like local wireless mesh networks.

1983 Richard Stallman launched the GNU Project, 1996 Linus Torvalds started Linux, 1997 started Slashdot, 1999 Indymedia was started, in 2000 the first freifunk enthusiasts started experimenting in London and Berlin, in January 2001 Wikipedia went online, in July 2001 the P2P-Network BitTorrent was set up, the development of the free search engine Nutch began 2002 and the P2P search engine Yacy was first tested 2004. These are examples of projects of people who started to create free and open structures – of people who create free layers for everyone to use.

How is this possible? Why do people do this? How can they afford to work like that?

The ideas behind setting up free layers are ground shaping. They include a complete cultural and civilizational change of how we behave, work, communicate and live together. The idea behind is a new social contract where you give freely and receive freely. These people simply have fun by doing what they are doing and additionally their motivation is to do good like for example to educate and help others.

The surprise is that this system is working as a real economic system – a sharing economy, where everyone wins. What you get is always more than what you give. This is especially true in the free software community, where a person puts his work into a software program and in exchange gets back the work of sometimes hundreds of programmers, who worked on other parts of the software. This example was famously made by Rishab Ayer Ghosh: You give one hour and you get back the work of hundreds or thousands of hours of programmers around the world. It is a point where you always get back more than you give – a real win-win-situation.

Of course this example cannot be transferred exactly to the “world of things”. When you have one apple and you share it with someone, you will only have half an apple. However in a world where technology is the driving force of the economy, the knowledge of how to produce something becomes often much more valuable than the availability of natural resources which can be delivered easily anywhere in today’s world.

And in fact what we can observe is that besides the production of free software (e.g. Linux) and free content (e.g. Wikipedia) people begin to exchange knowledge of how to actually make and manipulate things like computer chips or wireless routers as well – driven by the ideas of free sharing and its personal profits or because they simply want to gain experience, get feedback or to have fun.

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Internationale Stimmung beim Sommerfest der Europa-Universität Viadrina in Frankfurt (Oder) und Słubice


Ein Rough-Cut von der "EUVenalia", den studentischen Festtagen an der Europa-Universität Viadrina in Frankfurt an der Oder und Słubice vom 11.-12. Juni 2002. Der Film fängt die internationale Stimmung beim Sommerfest der Universität ein. Nicht mehr ganz aktuell, aber einige Passagen sind vielleicht immer noch witzig anzuschauen. Länge: 38:42 min.

Free Culture, Free Software, Free Infrastructures! Openness and Freedom in every Layer of the Network (Flo Fleissig, Episode 1)

Flo Fleissig interviews Kloschi (Freifunk), Kurt Jansson (Wikimedia), Jürgen Neumann (Freifunk), Rishab Aiyer Ghosh (United Nations University), Lawrence Lessig (Creative Commons) and Allison and Benoit (Montréal Wireless)


"Hello this is Flo!" .. from the free culture, free software, free infrastructure conference Wizards of OS in Berlin. "It is good stuff you can do here. There are excellent panels with excellent people from all over the world." And Flo is gonna go out to interview some of those excellent people. Watch how Flo talks with Kloschi, Freifunk activist and developer from Leipzig (Germany), finds out that Kurt Jansson, head of the Wikimedia association in Germany, uses the same Freifunk gateway as himself or learns about the early days of free infrastructures in Germany by talking to Jürgen Neumann one of the "founding fathers" of the Freifunk community. Further on Rishab Ghosh from the United Nations University in Maastricht explains how open content and open infrastructure are closely related, before he gets an overview of the development of the world’s biggest wireless network in Berlin by Flo … And of course he also gets to know where he finds Flo’s node in the network. Also, Lawrence Lessig from Stanford University and Creative Commons (and without name tag) describes the free network project in Berlin as “an extremely important project to liberate the physical layer right now.” Flo: “Thank you Larry … and here is your name tag, which I found.” Finally Allison and Benoit from free wireless community in Montréal explain about different models to share and give us a few insights into the chances and difficulties you face when you try to establish a free and open network.

Vernissage in der Galerie Amerika in Berlin: Ausflug in die geheimnisvolle Welt der Sammler

Es ist Freitag der 13. Januar 2006. Wir sind in der Galerie Amerika (in der Brunnenstraße 7 in der Nähe vom Rosenthaler Platz). Es wird mit Stolz berichtet, dass Angela Merkel sie bereits besucht hat. Es gibt ein paar Flaschen nicht allzu billigen Wein, von dem man sich bedienen und der aus Plastikbecher getrunken werden kann und assoziative und konzeptuelle Kunst.
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